Search

Larry Hite – Mint

Larry Hite is partnering with ISAM Systematic Fund, a hedge fund run by Stanley Fink, the former CEO of Man Group, Plc.

Hite was featured in Market Wizards and founded Mint Investment Management.

Hite sold it to Man is 1983. Back then, Man (now MF Global Futures) was known as E.D. & F. Man which was a cash-commodity broker. They were founded in 1783 making them perhaps the oldest commodity broker in the world. Now their focus is on their roots of physical commodities.

Similar Posts:

  • Who Is Anthony Ward?
  • Bill Dunn Managed Futures Presentation
  • Marc Rich: The King of Oil
  • Taking Delivery: Commodity Education and Comedy
  • The Touch, The Feel of Trading Cotton Spreads

Be Sociable, Share!
  • more Larry Hite   Mint
  • uclatrader

    After reading this post, I went back to Jack Schwager's Market Wizards and re-read the interview with Larry Hite. It seems that Larry Hite is more focused on risk management than anything else. How much of a role should risk management play in one's trading strategy? In addition, what are some examples of risk management for a proprietary trader other than cutting losses short or sitting on one's hand's when there is too much volatility in the market?

  • martinkronicle

    Great question.

    Risk Management is all you should be thinking about, especially if you
    are a new trader or you are launching your CTA. Risk Management comes
    down to position sizing. You'll find out (the hard way) that most of the
    time you take a bigger than expected loss, you'll always regret the size
    of your position, more than your basis.

    /Set-ups/, as they are called, sell magazines and grab blog headlines,
    but you should focus 100% of your efforts to being able to define your
    risk at any given moment, than how to enter a trade. The minute you
    cannot define your risk, you should go to cash. Only bad things can
    happen at that point.

    Larry Hite said it in his own works in /Broke: The New American Dream/:
    “I start with the one thing that I can know. How much I am willing to
    lose on a trade.”

    One thing you can do to minimize risk would be to cut your position size
    by a certain percent as the volatility increases. For example, you might
    have a rule that states “cut position by 25% or X # of contracts if the
    ATR (or volatility measurement) increases by 20%.” You can test the
    percentages and see how they affect your equity curve.

  • martinkronicle

    Great question.

    Risk Management is all you should be thinking about, especially if you
    are a new trader or you are launching your CTA. Risk Management comes
    down to position sizing. You'll find out (the hard way) that most of the
    time you take a bigger than expected loss, you'll always regret the size
    of your position, more than your basis.

    /Set-ups/, as they are called, sell magazines and grab blog headlines,
    but you should focus 100% of your efforts to being able to define your
    risk at any given moment, than how to enter a trade. The minute you
    cannot define your risk, you should go to cash. Only bad things can
    happen at that point.

    Larry Hite said it in his own works in /Broke: The New American Dream/:
    “I start with the one thing that I can know. How much I am willing to
    lose on a trade.”

    One thing you can do to minimize risk would be to cut your position size
    by a certain percent as the volatility increases. For example, you might
    have a rule that states “cut position by 25% or X # of contracts if the
    ATR (or volatility measurement) increases by 20%.” You can test the
    percentages and see how they affect your equity curve.

  • Pingback: What Is Risk? | MartinKronicle